Scrutinies? What? Why?

Apparently, there have been some questions raised among the membership of Faith regarding something that’s happened the past three weeks prior to the Prayer of the Church.

At the Vigil of Easter on April 15, a young woman will be baptized here at Faith.  I’ve been meeting with her and and her mother for two or three months, answering questions, reading the Scriptures, and preparing her for baptism.  Since very early in the Church’s history, the time prior to the celebration of the Resurrection was used to instruct those who were to be baptized at Easter, since that was the primary (and in some places, only) time when baptisms took place.

While preparing people for baptism, there have been many different forms of instruction, and various rites and practices to lead people to the baptismal water.  As it is for the Ethiopian eunuch in Acts 8; Lydia and the Philippian jailer in Acts 16; and pretty much all the other adult converts from Acts 2 on, they are instructed, they believe, and they are baptized.  Part of that instruction as it developed in the Church–especially, after the destruction of Jerusalem, once the Church began to instruct people who did not know the Old Testament–included various events and rites to help bring people into the fullness of the Christian faith.  For example, Cyril of Jerusalem used to physically walk people from the place of Christ’s crucifixion to the place of His empty tomb within the walls of the church that had been built over the believed sites of those events.  There were also other physical movements associated with baptism meant to signify the transfer of a person from old to new life, from death to life, from blindness to sight, and from darkness to light.

Now, only God can make Christians, and so His work and promise in Holy Baptism, believed by the person baptized, is the decisive point.  Nevertheless, it does not take away from that decisive point of conversion if–prior to baptism, as well as afterward–the Church hands over the substance of the Christian faith in Creed, prayer, and the Word and blesses the person on his or her way to the water of baptism, and on to the resurrection.  We pray that God would preserve newborns who have not yet been baptized, and we pray the same for adults on their way to baptism.

Prayer and hearing the Word of God in Christ are the ways of preparation, just as they have always been.  Why do it publicly within the Divine Service?  So that the members of the congregation can bear witness, for the sake of the one to be baptized, to the promises of God present in His Word and in baptism, as well as remember the promises God made to each person in his or her baptism.  Such prayer and blessing is absolutely catholic–what the Church has done in all places and all times.  There’s nothing distinctly Roman Catholic about it.

Why is it called a “scrutiny”?  Because in the beginning of the Church, the sponsors (who were the same people who introduced a person to Christ’s Church) were asked to testify that the person really did want to become a Christian and was not doing it to spy out the Church (when Christianity was illegal) or for any material benefit (once Christianity became the official religion of the Roman Empire).  So the candidate for baptism and the sponsors were “scrutinized” to that effect.

It seems that many people were not prepared for this public process, and for that I take full responsibility.  I hope this little explanation has cleared up some of the questions.  I would also remind everyone that I am available often for anyone to ask any questions that might arise.  People who don’t know the answers, on the other hand, are probably not good resources of whom to ask the questions one may have.

Feel free to clarify any of this at any time.  For now, I ask you to rejoice with me and with the angels in heaven that God is claiming another person for His Kingdom through His Son, Christ, and in the power of the Holy Spirit.  God grant you a blessed celebration of Jesus’ resurrection, as you remember your own resurrection to eternal life in Holy Baptism.

Pr. Winterstein

Bible Study Summary, 9/6/15

[We are using Pr. Matt Richard‘s helpful study, “How Do We View Christianity?” which sums up two ways of looking at the various aspects of human beings, sin, free will, salvation, and more.]

Our discussion on Sunday revolved around where Justification (being right with God) is located (p. 7 in the study guide): is it something that happens individually, within each person?  Is the primary meaning of justification my internal transformation: that justification is something that happens within my heart?  Or is it something that happens outside me, in Christ, because of His death and resurrection?  We might be tempted to go with the first option, since that seems to make it more personal.  But our discussion of the location of our assurance of salvation made it clear that if justification happens inside us, then we are going to look for the assurance of our justification also within ourselves.  But to look within for assurance is always uncertain and changing, since our emotions, circumstances, and experiences are always changing.  In the midst of a changing world and changing circumstances, we needs a certain word and an unchanging promise–which can only be found outside us in Christ, who is the same yesterday, today, and forever.  “On Christ, the solid rock, I stand; all other ground is sinking sand.”

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Bible Study Summary, 8/30/15

[We are using Pr. Matt Richard‘s helpful study, “How Do We View Christianity?” which sums up two ways of looking at the various aspects of human beings, sin, free will, salvation, and more.]

On Sunday we discussed questions on p. 6-7 in the study guide.  We talked about what difference it makes in how we present the Gospel if (A) we believe that faith is a person’s decision to accept God’s grace, or (B) we believe that faith itself is a gift from God by which we receive the Gospel.  If faith is an individual’s decision, then you would present the Gospel so as to make the case for the Gospel, about which the other person would have to decide.  But if the Scriptures show us that individuals apart from the Holy Spirit are deaf, blind, and dead in their sin, then they cannot make a decision about the Gospel, and will always choose the opposite of the Gospel.  On the other hand, if that’s true about people, then our sole responsibility is for the Gospel and for telling it to people.  The Holy Spirit does the entire work, when and where He wills, of converting, enlightening, and granting faith in that Gospel.

We also talked about the Bible, and whether it contains the Word of God, or whether it is the Word of God.  Someone made the point that throughout, “Plan A” in the study puts the individual person in control, whereas “Plan B” makes God the subject of the verbs.  In this question, the same is true.  If the Bible only contains the Word of God (i.e., some things in the Bible are not the Word of God, but solely the words of men), who decides which words are God’s and which words are merely human?  The reader of the Scriptures is put over the Scriptures, rather than the Scriptures over the person.  We also made the point that this belief in the Scriptures as wholly the Word of God is only true because Jesus is the Word of God.  If the words of the Scriptures are all true, it is because Jesus is the Truth.  If the words of the Scriptures show us the way, it is because Jesus is the Way.  If the Scriptures shine a light for us to walk by, it is because Jesus is the Light of the World.  All the words of the Scriptures are true because they all testify of Him.